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so it seems as if these guys want to drop a V8 in the Mazda2, i'm having many doubts about this.

to being, the weight balance will be VERY off. The Mazda2 was built to be light as possible, just imagine a big heavy V8 sitting in that. then the other issue is fitment.


from inside line, read on:



I think it would be a better idea to swap in a bigger 4 cylinder mazda engine or even a Mazda v6.




Through a variety of circumstances, I drove the Mazda 2 to an open house at Ed Pink Racing Engines, all the way out in a remote and very disreputable corner of Van Nuys where Ed Pink began building Hemis for the best drag racers of the 1960s.

Frank Honsowetz, EPRE’s general manager, offered to liven up the Mazda 2 with one of the 360-hp, 165-cubic-inch (2.7-liter) inline-4 Toyota engines that the shop builds for racers in the USAC Midget series, but I respectfully declined.

Then he showed me one of the vintage-racing engines that EPRE rebuilds these days, and while the 800-hp, supercharged, twin-plug version of Bud Winfield and Leo Goossen’s Novi V8 tempted me for a moment just for the opportunity to hear the scream of its 10-inch, Paxton centrifugal supercharger (the tip speed of the impeller is on the order of a wildly inefficient Mach 2!), it was clear that this engine from one of Andy Granatelli's Indy cars of the 1960s would never fit into the Mazda 2.



By the end of the day, though, I was happier with the Mazda 2’s 100-hp 1.5-liter engine. That’s because I drove all the way down to San Diego and back to see another racing friend drive in the HSMA event at Coronado Island, and once I filled the tank I discovered that my long day on the freeway had been made pretty affordable thanks to a final tally of 38.7 mpg.

It’s easy to be dismissive of small-displacement engines, but they incorporate more technology than you realize. EPRE’s Larry Ingham reminded me of that as he showed me the cylinder head from the 3.0-liter inline-6 of a 1957 Mercedes-Benz 300SL, which he says became the inspiration for the 2.4-liter inline-6 of the original Datsun 240Z. Every generation of engine builds on the knowledge of the generation before, and the engines that we take for granted today incorporate secrets at which we can barely guess.

Since horsepower seems so much more impressive than mpg, fuel efficiency doesn’t get much play when car guys gather. Maybe there should be more talk about what it actually costs to go someplace, like the $32 in regular fuel that the Mazda 2 went through while in my hands for more than 300 miles over the weekend.

After all, no one understands that performance costs money more than racers.

Michael Jordan, Executive Editor, Edmunds.com @ 14,085 miles

 

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Great write-up!

As a long time rotary engine owner, I've been up and down the horsepower debate and found that it is but one aspect of performance but sadly the only number most people see. The RX8 is not a numbers car and looks poor on paper but provides an experience (and racing pedigree) that isn't matched by much in it's class.

That said, I agree that the HP aspects of the Mazda2 are simply a distraction from an otherwise great performing vehicle. As I continue to use this car on the race track and in competitive situations I find that it's more of a tall Miata than anything else.

Frankly, I think it's a highly underestimated car and I look forward to exploiting that.
 

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Great write-up!

As a long time rotary engine owner, I've been up and down the horsepower debate and found that it is but one aspect of performance but sadly the only number most people see. The RX8 is not a numbers car and looks poor on paper but provides an experience (and racing pedigree) that isn't matched by much in it's class.

That said, I agree that the HP aspects of the Mazda2 are simply a distraction from an otherwise great performing vehicle. As I continue to use this car on the race track and in competitive situations I find that it's more of a tall Miata than anything else.

Frankly, I think it's a highly underestimated car and I look forward to exploiting that.
I see potential in the Mazda2, i think it just needs time for the aftermarket industry to play their role and get more tuners on the Mazda2.

During the mazda2 debut, Mazda did take a few modified Mazda2's with them to shows, i hope that did some good with inspiring people to start their own Mazda 2 build.
 

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Great write-up!

As a long time rotary engine owner, I've been up and down the horsepower debate and found that it is but one aspect of performance but sadly the only number most people see. The RX8 is not a numbers car and looks poor on paper but provides an experience (and racing pedigree) that isn't matched by much in it's class.

That said, I agree that the HP aspects of the Mazda2 are simply a distraction from an otherwise great performing vehicle. As I continue to use this car on the race track and in competitive situations I find that it's more of a tall Miata than anything else.

Frankly, I think it's a highly underestimated car and I look forward to exploiting that.
I agree with you here. When I first test drove the 2, I was very impressed. This car drives way better than I thought it would, and its such a fun car. I also love the driving position that it offers, and the feel of its shifter/transmission. The b-spec mazda 2, which is all stock besides its coilover set up, is capable of pulling 1.3gs! Incredible
 
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