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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm glad that Mazda is focusing on lean gas engines rather than trying to put hybrid engines in as much vehicles as possible unlike some brands out their!

Cars with lean gas engines will be better for the average person since everything will be cheap. Hybrid vehicles just cost way too much right now.

TOKYO — Mazda's president believes gasoline engines will still power 80 to 90 percent of the world's autos even in 20 years time, and remains confident the carmaker can grow without electric vehicles.

The comments Thursday from Mazda Motor Corp. President Takashi Yamanouchi contrast with the strategy at Japanese rival Nissan Motor Co., which is banking heavily on its Leaf electric car, one of the first mass-produced EVs on the market.

Yamanouchi said Mazda's efficient gas engine called "Skyactiv" will be a pillar of its growth strategy as the Hiroshima-based manufacturer seeks to boost sales in emerging markets, where electric vehicles and hybrids aren't expected to be as popular as in developed nations.

"Skyactiv will be one of the drivers of our growth," Yamanouchi told reporters at a Tokyo hotel, where Mazda showed a new subcompact.
Mazda currently has no hybrid vehicle in its lineup. It plans to start selling a hybrid by 2013.

Hybrids still require gas engines, and Yamanouchi said they can be counted as part of what will be the 80 or 90 percent of cars that aren't electric.
Nissan has sold about 8,000 of its Leaf electric vehicles around the world, more than half in Japan, since its gradual global rollout started in December.
That's a tiny fraction of the world auto market. But Yokohama-based Nissan is targeting production of 250,000 electric vehicles a year globally by 2015, stressing that concerns about global warming and pollution are growing.
Mazda began selling the Demio, known as Mazda2 overseas, in Japan on Thursday, offering a version packed with Skyactiv technology. It is targeting 6,000 overall Demio sales a month.

The automaker said it was not planning to sell the Skyactiv Demio overseas, but was planning the green technology for bigger models.
The Skyactiv Demio gets as much as 30 kilometers a liter (71 miles per gallon), according to Mazda. Other features, such as "idling stop," in which the engine turns off automatically while at a traffic light and other temporary stops, helps boost mileage.

Mazda is building engine and vehicle assembly plants in Mexico for small cars, such as Mazda2 and Mazda3, for markets in Central America and South America.

It has said it will stop building the midsize Mazda6 sedan at its 50-50 joint venture with Ford Motor Co. in Flat Rock, Michigan, but did not specify exactly when that would be, leaving the fate of the plant unclear. Mazda's output there has been at about 40,000 vehicles a year.

Mazda, which has lost money for the last three fiscal years, is struggling to assert its brand without counting on its longtime partnership with Ford.
No replacement partnership has been announced, and Mazda has repeatedly said Ford remains a key partner.

Dearborn-based Ford bought 25 percent of the Japanese carmaker in 1979, raising it to 33.4 percent in 1996. But Ford began cutting ties in 2008, and last year lowered its ownership to 3.5 percent.
Like other Japanese automakers, Mazda has been hurt by supplier disruptions from the March 11 earthquake and tsunami in northeastern Japan. It is also hurt more than others by the surging yen because it sells vehicles made at overseas plants in Japan.

Yamanouchi reiterated the company's target for annual global sales of 1.7 million vehicles by the fiscal year ending March 2016. Mazda sold 1.1 million vehicles for the fiscal year ended March 2011

Read more: http://www.thenewstribune.com/2011/06/30/1726796/mazda-sees-growth-with-lean-gas.html#ixzz1RXMLoD87
 

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I agree. Hybrids are actually helping postpone zero emission cars like Battery and H2 Fuel Cell. The car companies spent millions developing hybrid, when they could have spent less to refine the already existing electric technologies.

I prefer Mazdas approach of not trying to simply con the public into thinking they are doing something when they are not. As long as the oil companies have their foot on the car makers' necks, at least Mazda is focusing on making affordable higher MPG cars, instead of smoke and mirrors.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I agree. Hybrids are actually helping postpone zero emission cars like Battery and H2 Fuel Cell. The car companies spent millions developing hybrid, when they could have spent less to refine the already existing electric technologies.

I prefer Mazdas approach of not trying to simply con the public into thinking they are doing something when they are not. As long as the oil companies have their foot on the car makers' necks, at least Mazda is focusing on making affordable higher MPG cars, instead of smoke and mirrors.
So true.

Mazda's approach is a win win situation for everyone really. Oil companies, Mazda owners, and Mazda.

Looking forward to see how well Mazda's approach will do for them on paper compared to other companies that are pushing the electric vehicle and hybrid vehicle idea.
 

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Lean Engines

Yes, hybrids and EVs seem to be hype and are not cost effective at this time. They seem to be a feel good vehicle. Get a green label on your hybrid SUV that gets 28mpgs!

I entertained a Honda Insight before the M2. It's the "cheap" hybrid and based on research of those who commute long distances like me, I might get 45mpg hwy. But I also knew for $7k less I could get 40mpg in the M2 and I'm currently getting 41+.

The Focus EV sounds interesting (I've owned several Fords and Foci's) but I'm sure it's $30k or more. I read the other day about a solar recharge panel that would help even more but it's a $10k cost. A million miles later, the EV might have a pay back.

The technology is there to obtain 50mpgs on a lean engine but many won't buy a 100hp or less car with just a gas engine. Odd they are more than willing to spend $10k+ more for a sub-100hp Prius since it has the green label. The push for more lean engines will not happen until gas stays at $5 or more for a period of time in the US. I just hope manufacturers continue providing at least some options in the interim.
 
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